Safety Management

Analyzing Older Driver Motor Vehicle Injuries in New Jersey Using Linked Data In Reserve

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), by 2045, there will be an estimated 84 million Americans older than 65, nearly twice as many as there is today. More specifically, by 2030, it is expected that New Jersey will see a 60% increase in the population of people 65 years and older. Older adults are more likely to have developed physical limitations, which may prevent walking and driving, and may make... more »

Idea Submitted by Mohammad Jalayer, Williams Beans, Mohsen Jafari, and David Livingston

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other Center for Advanced Infrastructure and Transportation (CAIT), Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey; Rutgers, New Jersey Medical School University Hospital

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) Mr. Paul Thomas, NJDOT

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

Research in this area is of great importance because the number of motor vehicle crashes in New Jersey involving drivers 65 years of age and older has increased over the last several years. To be specific, during an eight-year (2006-2013) period, the number of older drivers involved in motor vehicle crashes in New Jersey had increased each year, including a 24% increase in older driver crash involvement from 2012 to 2013. Given these sobering statistics, motor vehicle injury among older adults requires special attention. The outcomes obtained from this study will provide significant information for NJDOT and local agencies, law enforcement, and medical and hospital staff to enhance safety across the state through reducing this crash type and its outcomes.

Archive: 2017 Ideas
Reserved
Archive: 2017 Ideas

Safety Management

Best practices in creating and maintaining a statewide bike and pedestrian data collection system In Reserve

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has identified New Jersey as a pedestrian and bicycle focus state. New Jersey ranks 3rd among all states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia, in pedestrian fatalities as a percentage of total fatalities. In 2015, New Jersey had 173 pedestrian fatalities representing 31% of all motor vehicle fatalities. The national average is 15%. In New Jersey, between 2006 and 2011, child... more »

Idea Submitted by Sean Meehan and Leigh Ann Von Hagen

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center, Rutgers University

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) Elise Bremer-Nei, NJDOT

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

Establishing a bicycle and pedestrian data collection system will assist NJDOT and other agencies in maximizing the mobility, safety, access and quality of the walking and bicycling environment. The characteristics of the entire roadway must be known in order to better serve the needs of pedestrians and bicyclists, fund pedestrian and bicycle projects, evaluate facility usage over time, and provide quantifiable evidence to support bicycle and pedestrian facility inclusion as part of the Complete Streets movement.

Archive: 2017 Ideas
Reserved
Archive: 2017 Ideas

Safety Management

An evaluation of the usage & effectiveness of disability roadway warning signs in New Jersey In Reserve

American Community Survey data (2015) shows that over ten percent of New Jersey’s population has one or more disabilities, with increased prevalence rates for certain disabilities in recent years. For example, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimate that New Jersey has the highest rate of Autism Spectrum Disorder of any state in the nation, with one in every 41 NJ children affected with ASD.

Over the past decade,... more »

Idea Submitted by Cecilia Feeley, Andrea Lubin, Mohammad Jalayer

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other Rutgers University - Center for Advanced Infrastructure & Transportation (CAIT) & Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center (VTC)

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) Mr. Paul Thomas, NJDOT

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

The increasing presence of these types of roadway warning signs are evident throughout New Jersey in both urban and suburban locales, with families of persons with disability often encouraged to advocate for the sign placement in their respective community. However, are these signs effective in meeting desired roadway safety goals? Does the presence of such signage influence driver speed and/or crash rates? Currently, these vital findings are unknown, yet disability-specific traffic/roadway warning signs continue to be employed throughout New Jersey. A study evaluating the effectiveness of these warning signs should be prioritized, as findings will benefit all roadway users, persons with disability, as well as New Jersey policy makers, legislators, and medical and transportation professionals. Further, due to the lack of research on this topic, findings will also benefit state departments of transportation and safety professionals nationwide seeking to achieve safer, more accessible roadways for all users.

Archive: 2017 Ideas
Reserved
Archive: 2017 Ideas

Safety Management

Comprehensive Analysis of Wrong-Way Driving Crashes in State of New Jersey In Reserve

Wrong-way driving (WWD) occurs when a driver, either inadvertently or deliberately, drives in the opposing direction of traffic along a high-speed, physically divided highway or its access ramp. WWD crashes are known for their tendency for being more severe than other types of freeway crashes and resulting in more fatalities because they are mostly head-on or opposite-direction sideswipe collisions. On a nationwide scale,... more »

Idea Submitted by Mohammad Jalayer

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other Center for Advanced Infrastructure and Transportation (CAIT) at Rutgers University

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) Mr. Paul Thomas, NJDOT; New Jersey State Police

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

An inquiry of the NHTSA’s Fatality Analysis Reporting Systems (FARS) database revealed that between 2004 to 2011, New Jersey is among the top 15 states with the most WWD fatalities. In addition, several high-profile instances of WWD occur each year across the state (e.g., two instances in the past couple months). As such, these crashes merit special attention and further consideration. This study will provide valuable information for New Jersey Department of Transportation and local agencies to achieve a significant reduction in the number of WWD incidents and crashes, which will result in saving lives and reducing crash costs to society overall.

Archive: 2017 Ideas
Reserved
Archive: 2017 Ideas