Multimodal

Comprehensive Study of Newark Light Rail Transit In Reserve

There are three Light Rail Transit (LRT) systems in New Jersey: Hudson Bergen, Riverline and Newark. During the past decades or so, various studies on ridership, economic and TOD issues have taken places along HBLRT and Riverline while the oldest LRT in New Jersey, Newark Subway, has been chugging along without much systematic evaluation. Given the newly reinvigorated interests and revitalization effort in the City of... more »

Idea Submitted by R. Liu

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other NJIT

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) NJ Transit

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

The study will produce a guidebook for LRT development and its interaction with urban development, which is valuable to NJ DOT/NJ Transit decision makers and other LRT developments in the US and around the world. It will provide a proactive roadmap for New Jersey residents to take full advantages of available resources to improve their travel options, therefore, qualify of life.

Archive: 2018 Ideas
Reserved
Archive: 2018 Ideas

Multimodal

Connection and Expansion of the Newark Light Rail with Existing Rail Infrastructure In Reserve

Utilizing the existing rail infrastructure of the surrounding urban-suburban areas, connect the Newark Light rail with points north. Using a defunct section of the Erie R.R along the north section of Branch Brook Park to connect the existing Newark Light Rail to a portion of the Norfolk and Southern that runs along the Passaic River. Connecting to the Norfolk and Southern owned portion would further connect the system... more »

Idea Submitted by Austin Tooker

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) NJ Transit

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

This would utilize existing structures to allow for alternative travel to and through Newark. As New Jersey's largest city and a growing one for that matter, transportation is crucial for city development. The Newark City Subway or Lightrail is connected to universities, major corporations, cultural activities, and nightlife. To reduce traffic from these northern Essex and Southern Passaic County locations, providing efficent light rail service will reduce the need for traffic-creating motor vehicles. Current methods of travel to from these areas to Newark rely on buses which are subject to traffic and overcrowding. Since there is an existing right of way, residents will have direct access to Newark Penn station and connections there; as well as, Clifton station and points north and south. Currently, riders who's final destination from Clifton is Newark Penn Station are required to travel to Secaucus and transfer before arriving in Newark. Under this plan, there would be a one-seat ride through Newark to Penn Station

Archive: 2018 Ideas
Reserved
Archive: 2018 Ideas

Multimodal

"Micro-transit" in New Jersey Proof of Concept In Reserve

Agencies across the country are using technology and new mobility options to expand their focus from being a provider of fixed route public transit to being the manager of public and private mobility options. This customer-focused approach seeks to capitalize on new technologies and mobility options to improve the efficiency of fixed route services, enhance the transit customer's experience and in some case deliver service... more »

Idea Submitted by Jon Carnegie

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other Rutgers University - Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) NJ TRANSIT

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

Paratransit services such as NJ TRANSIT's Access Link are very expensive to provide. At the same time, current practice requires Access Link Customers to reserve rides at least 24 hours in advance and they have a wait window of 45 minutes on each side of the scheduled appointment. Micro-transit projects implemented in other locations throughout the US have demonstrated the feasibility of implementing on-demand services for general public, seniors and people with disabilities at a significant cost savings, while also vastly improving the customer experience. This type of innovative public transit service needs to be piloted and evaluated in New Jersey to see how it can be successfully implemented. New ways of providing public transit service in more efficient, affordable ways is critically needed in New Jersey.

Archive: 2018 Ideas
Reserved
Archive: 2018 Ideas

Multimodal

Multi-Modal Circulation in and around Hoboken Terminal In Reserve

On a daily basis, approximately 10,000 pedestrians walk or bicycle from the City of Hoboken to the Hoboken Terminal, with many people heading to the PATH Station and others headed to the trains, buses, light rail or ferry. The pedestrians, cyclists and motorists (including private autos, taxis, transportation network company vehicles like Uber and Lyft, trucks and buses) make the area around the Hoboken Terminal very... more »

Idea Submitted by Susan O'Donnell

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other NJ TRANSIT, Market Research

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) Alan Kearns, NJ TRANSIT Capital Planning

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

As Hoboken continues to change and transportation and pedestrian needs both compliment and compete with each other, solutions to provide safe and efficient pedestrian paths should be developed. The project will provide pedestrian flow data on streets around Hoboken Terminal which will be used to coordinate with the city and facilitate design between modes within and adjacent to the terminal. Modes include: Train, light rail, ferry, PATH, bus, taxi, jitney as well as pedestrians.

Archive: 2018 Ideas
Reserved
Archive: 2018 Ideas

Multimodal

Analyzing the Impact of Transit-Oriented Developments on Transit Usage In Reserve

While there is a broad consensus that TODs induce additional ridership on the transit system, the actual net impact remains unclear. This project will seek to survey residents of TODs to determine how their trip patterns have shifted and to explore the attitudes, values and preferences in the choice of living adjacent to a transit station or stop. An additional task may seek to survey customers of TOD retail. The results... more »

Idea Submitted by Susan O'Donnell

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other NJ TRANSIT Market Research

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) Mathew Safer, Sr. Director of Demand Forecasting and Research

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

NJ Transit is frequently asked to assess the impact of TODs on transit ridership and parking demand. While we utilize anecdotal evidence and national examples to generate impacts from new developments, we have no firm data on the impact of these developments in New Jersey. As more redevelopment takes place adjacent to transit facilities, this data will help create better estimates of ridership changes and reductions in parking demand.

Archive: 2018 Ideas
Reserved
Archive: 2018 Ideas

Multimodal

Hover cars In Reserve

With the advent of driverless cars and electric cars and drones, we need to look towards the future. People have successfully made drones that can carry one person plus baggage and fly at over 60 mph under controlled flight. As these vehicles get more powerful and larger, we will have the ability to have hover cars. No more worrying about potholes! Maybe?

A study needs to be done to determine how this type of vehicle... more »

Idea Submitted by Nicole Einthoven

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other NJ DOT Capital Program Management Capital Program Support Design Standards

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

This is a priority because these types of vehicles already exist, there will be more innovation, and people will want to test them on real roads just like driverless cars are being tested on real roads and just like corporations would like to deliver packages and pizza via drone.
Traffic lights will apply to hover cars regardless of their height above the ground. Pedestrian collisions are a concern. Landing safely in a parking spot at a crowded mall could be a challenge with grounded cars vying for the same spot. Will the FAA try to regulate them? What about overhead road signs? What about power and phone wires? We need to start / continue thinking about this so we can be ready when hover cars are viable products on the market.

Archive: 2018 Ideas
Reserved
Archive: 2018 Ideas

Multimodal

New Transit Model Needed In Reserve

The classic model of a train stopping at different stations along its track is no longer feasible in a state as densely populated as New Jersey. Technology is now at a point where we can adopt a model that has been suggested for decades in different forms, but until recently, it was not technologically feasible. The electric car model of having the batteries and motors built into the floor of the vehicle would allow... more »

Idea Submitted by Gary Vetro

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other Department of Transportation

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) NJ Transit

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

Trains are overcrowded and electrical problems have frequently caused delays to increase that overcrowding. New technology is needed to allow for more cars to pickup more passengers without the need for expanding infrastructure. Having trains that could coordinate with each other to run closer together, and/or minimize stops passengers have to endure will increase efficiency and give passengers a better overall experience.

Archive: 2018 Ideas
Reserved
Archive: 2018 Ideas

Multimodal

Methodology Development for Bicycle Parking Investment Prioritization In Reserve

NJ TRANSIT rail stations operate as multimodal hubs, often with access to at least one other transit mode in addition to vehicle and non-motorized access. Over the past five years, select stations on the rail network have experienced significant increases in bicycle parking demand. This study will consist of three phases, with an end goal of developing a methodology for prioritizing locations of future bicycle parking... more »

Idea Submitted by Susan O'Donnell

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other NJ TRANSIT Market Research

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) Jennifer Buison, NJ TRANSIT Capital Planning

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

Investing in bike parking is a key strategy for maximizing multimodal access to transit stations. Convenient and low cost (or free) parking is a tangible benefit to transit customers, and encourages bicycle use as an access mode to transit. Improved bike access also has the potential to reduce traffic congestion near stations and relieve vehicle parking demand, which can be a benefit to communities that host rail stations.

Archive: 2018 Ideas
Reserved
Archive: 2018 Ideas

Multimodal

Bus Ridership Data Analysis System In Reserve

Developing a comprehensive Bus Ridership Data Analysis System would allow NJ TRANSIT to better anticipate travel demand, more effectively ensure that all communities are provided equitable service, and better target its customer outreach efforts. Currently, NJ TRANSIT uses fare revenue as an indicator of passenger ridership. The agency also relies on passenger surveys to obtain samples of ridership demographics as well... more »

Idea Submitted by Susan O'Donnell

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other NJ TRANSIT Market Research

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) Aaron Reisner, Senior Transportation GIS Analyst, NJ TRANSIT

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

As New Jersey's demographic makeup and development patterns continue to change at a rapid pace, travel patterns and demands continue to shift as well. The State's transit agency requires a practical way to track these trends so that it can respond to them, adjust service patterns, and offer appropriate communication services to its customers. At the same time, NJ TRANSIT increasingly seeks to perform more robust analyses to ensure compliance with Title VI Civil Rights regulations prohibiting discrimination. The Bus Ridership Data Analysis System will provide the access and querying capabilities necessary to effectively safeguard against discriminatory policies and submit more precise Title VI compliance reports to the FTA.

The benefits of the effort will be several-fold. A more precise understanding of customer demographics and travel patterns will enable NJ TRANSIT to better tailor its customer communication plans. This effort will in turn lead to better information on passenger loads, payments methods, and individual bus stop usage. NJ TRANSIT can use these findings as input for forecasting models, farezone delineation efforts, and other bus service planning activities, ultimately better serving all NJ TRANSIT bus customers.

Archive: 2018 Ideas
Reserved
Archive: 2018 Ideas