Multimodal

Introducing High Speed Rail (HSR) System and Mag-Lev Trains in USA In Reserve

The dense population of the northeastern United States makes the Northeast Corridor the most heavily traveled portion of the American passenger rail system. Nearly two-thirds of rail passengers in the United States live in New York City, also home to the nation's busiest passenger rail station, Penn Station. High speed trains can compete with airliners,
New Jersey State also has a unique location in the Northeast on... more »

Idea Submitted by Mohiuddin Ali Khan

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other Dr. Ali Khan & Associates, Consulting Engineers, Moorestown, NJ 08057

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) NOT KNOWN

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

It has made NJ one of the most congested areas. International airports such as Newark, Le Guardia and even JFK in New York City use NJ highways daily. Freight traffic by trucks has increased for serving the goods from ships at Boston and Connecticut ports. Southern cities such as Camden, Cherry Hill and Glassboro are becoming more congested due to their important locations close to Philadelphia and Wilmington. Therefore, there is a need for rapid form of transportation to cater for future needs of growing traffic. Daily congestions by traffic jams, result in continued wastage of time of the public, fuel consumption, occasional accidents and air pollution.

Train fuels worldwide have changed from coal to diesel, diesel-electric, electric and to magnetic levitation, resulting in slow to medium and to high speeds.

Current magnet levitation fuel technology available can generate speeds 200 km/hr and greater. Travel time can be reduced by more than half which is very convenient for daily commute by surface trains.

Since 1964, the United States has been exploring the potential of high-speed rail transportation. Following the success of Japan's newly inaugurated Shinkansen network, the High Speed Ground Transportation Act of 1965 authorized the U.S. government to the introduction of Metro liner trains, the predecessor to Acela. During the 1980s the US Federal Railroad Administration prepared a series of reports on “Emerging Corridors” in the United States. In 1991, the passage of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act authorized five rail corridors for examination as possible high speed rail corridors. On March 9, 1999, Amtrak unveiled its plan for a high-speed train, the Acela Express.

However, there have been constraints in making high speed rail a real possibility in the U.S. Despite high investments by Amtrak in the ACELA Express High-Speed Train, average speeds are approximately 63 MPH - far from its maximum. The Texas Central Partner’s bullet train failed, due to various constraints. In California, there were many environmental problems introducing HSR. Among the constraints to overcome along the Northeast Corridor (NEC):

  1. Acela operates along routes that are also used by freight and slower regional passenger traffic, and only reaches its maximum speed along short sections. The entire 457-mile (735 km) route from Boston to Washington takes 7 hours, at an average of around 65 miles per hour (105 km/h).

  2. In practice, the Acela's speed depends more on local restrictions along its corridor than on its trainset.

  3. In addition to speed restrictions through urban areas, the Acela's corridor includes several speed restrictions below 60–80 mph (97–129 km/h) over older bridges, or through tunnels a century old or more. Altogether, Amtrak has identified 224 bridges along Acela's route that are beyond their design life.

  4. Acela power cars and passenger cars are much heavier than those of the TGV in order to meet the United States Federal Railroad Administration's different approach to rail crash standards.

  5. The former Shore Line, from New Haven to Boston, is burdened by sharp turns and grade crossings, the crossings being of special concern.

  6. Commuters and politicians were also concerned over inadequate warnings and safeguards. The two-foot wide yellow platform markings may not be wide enough to keep commuters away from the edge when Acela trainsets pass at high speed.

Introducing Maglev-Trains: A high-speed train is generally defined as one which operates at speeds of over or at 200 km/h (124 mph), with a high level of service, and generally comprising multi-powered elements.

Avoiding rush hour traffic and working within 50 miles of home could be possible benefits of a the Maglev technology. That's because one working plan calls for 300-mile-per-hour train that floats on magnets to run from downtown Washington, D.C., to Manhattan. The train, faster than anything currently in operation, would make the trip in about an hour -- or nearly three times as fast as Amtrak's Acela service. The train itself is built around a Japanese technology known as magnetic levitation. Instead of wheels riding along a rail, maglev uses powerful, electrically charged magnets to suspend the train midair inside a U-shaped guide rail built on either side of the track. The magnets both lift the train and propel it forward, with the reduced friction being responsible for the train's super speed.

But it's expensive. Northeast Maglev estimates the New York to D.C. route could cost over $100 billion. Much of the money would be spent on tunnels and elevated track necessary in such a densely populated area -- possibly tunneling under cities and then running over or adjacent to Interstate 95 in more rural areas.

They've been promised funding from the Japanese government -- which is keen to export the technology -- and plan on raising the rest of the money through the private capital markets. However, TNEM (http://northeastmaglev.com/) has many offices set up in the Northeast. The next generation of very high speed Superconducting Maglev (SC Maglev) technology can lead to over 300 Mph speed. Although, permitting, rights of way and huge funding are the main hurdles, the benefits to public will outweigh the expense and bring USA at par with Japanese, Chinese and European countries.

Archive: 2017 Ideas
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Archive: 2017 Ideas

Multimodal

Improve Paratransit Service Via Share Mobility Applications In Reserve

The recent development in shared mobility and mobile computing may have potential to improve the paratransit service in NJ. An in-depth study of existing mobility needs and current supply of such services will help reveal the potential for such applications to be applied to improve paratransit. Specific applications may be tested to demonstrate the effectiveness of such.

Idea Submitted by R. Liu

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other NJIT

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) NJ Transit

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

Challenged by the scattered distributions, diversified travel need and unique travel conditions of its customers, Paratransit services are often plagued by inefficiency and poor customer services. The situation maybe even worse in New Jersey due to it higher share of special need populations.

Archive: 2017 Ideas
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Archive: 2017 Ideas

Multimodal

"Micro-transit" in New Jersey Proof of Concept In Reserve

Agencies across the country are using technology and new mobility options to expand their focus from being a provider of fixed route public transit to being the manager of public and private mobility options. This customer-focused approach seeks to capitalize on new technologies and mobility options to improve the efficiency of fixed route services, enhance the transit customer’s experience and in some case deliver service... more »

Idea Submitted by Jon Carnegie

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other Rutgers University - Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) NJ TRANSIT

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

Paratransit services such as NJ TRANSIT's Access Link are very expensive to provide. At the same time, current practice requires Access Link Customers to reserve rides at least 24 hours in advance and they have a wait window of 45 minutes on each side of the scheduled appointment. Micro-transit projects implemented in other locations throughout the US have demonstrated the feasibility of implementing on-demand services for general public, seniors and people with disabilities at a significant cost savings, while also vastly improving the customer experience. This type of innovative public transit service needs to be piloted and evaluated in New Jersey to see how it can be successfully implemented. New ways of providing public transit service in more efficient, affordable ways is critically needed in New Jersey.

Archive: 2017 Ideas
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Archive: 2017 Ideas

Multimodal

Dockless Bike Sharing and It's Potential to Expand Transit Catchment Areas In Reserve

Despite its early start in the 1960s and high expectations of positive contributions to the environment, health, and congestion relief, bike sharing has not made a significant impact on travel modal shift until recently, when dockless technology has been implemented in China, West Coast of US, and a few selected international locations.

A comprehensive research on dockless bike sharing is needed in order to gather information... more »

Idea Submitted by R. Liu

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other NJIT

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) NJ Transit

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

Given its densely populated areas, extensive transit use, and ever-increasing congestion, New Jersey may have great potential to utilize dockless bike sharing to increase transit ridership, promote intermodal coordination, and reduce congestion.

Archive: 2017 Ideas
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Archive: 2017 Ideas

Multimodal

Southern New Jersey Passenger Rail In Reserve

There is need for a long-term plan for regional or light rail to be extended through Southern New Jersey beyond Glassboro. This generational project could move along the Delaware River parallel to Route 130 and South and East along the 55 corridor. These corridors would jumpstart residential and commercial development in economically challenged areas. The State should also consider an Amtrak or regional rail line that... more »

Idea Submitted by Ron Burkhardt

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other Salem Community College

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) NJTRANSIT

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

This would allow for a build-out of Southern New Jersey, help the affordability of the State, and act as a subsidy and/or incentive for employers, residents, and developers.

Archive: 2017 Ideas
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Archive: 2017 Ideas

Multimodal

Platooning Large Trucks trending idea In Reserve

The chief cause of highway accidents is frontal collisions. Platooning is the act of automating the speed of a number of trucks in a chain, using radar and V2V communications. Platooning may prevent truck (and other crashes), resulting in lower crash rates and less travel delay. There is a financial aspect to safety. Trucks and other vehicles get damaged in crashes, and insurance companies have to pay crash costs.... more »

Idea Submitted by Richard Rabinowitz, Division of Statewide Planning

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other NJDOT / Bureau of Freight Planning and Services

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) Safety & Data Development; Multimodal - Trucking Services

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

Platooning may improve safety for workers, lessen travel delays, and reduce crash costs.

Archive: 2017 Ideas
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Archive: 2017 Ideas

Multimodal

Evaluation of Mobile Application's Impact on Bus Dwell Times trending idea In Reserve

The mobile application of NJ TRANSIT has the potential to expedite vehicle dwell times by simplifying the fare payment process at bus stops. Therefore, NJ TRANSIT would like to evaluate the impact of the mobile application on bus dwell times as compared to traditional fare media. This evaluation can use automatically collected data (such as farebox records or vehicle location data) and/or field work to record dwell... more »

Idea Submitted by Patrick Glasson

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other NJ Transit

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) Patrick Glasson, NJ Transit

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

NJ TRANSIT launched its mobile ticketing application in 2013 on our rail lines and has expanded it to serve the bus market. This study will assess if the mobile application results in vehicle cost savings to NJ TRANSIT in reduced dwell times of buses. The study would enable NJ TRANSIT to identify the cost savings to the agency from reduced dwell times of buses

Archive: 2017 Ideas
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Archive: 2017 Ideas

Multimodal

Newark Light Rail Origin-Destination and Intermodal Choice Study In Reserve

A two-part study is proposed: 1) a survey of the customers of the NJ TRANSIT Newark Light Rail Line (NRL) to understand their trip patterns and socio-economic characteristics, and 2) a survey of automobile drivers exiting I-280 at Exit 13 in Newark to understand their trip patterns and socio-economic characteristics, as a case study for improving intermodal travel options.

Part I (NRL) will provide information for NJ... more »

Idea Submitted by Susan O’Donnell; Senior Director, Business Analysis & Market Research

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other NJ TRANSIT

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) John D. Dean; Program Director, Research & Community Mobility, NJ TRANSIT

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

This project is a priority for NJ TRANSIT as Federal DOT and FTA requirements call for customer O-D surveys to be completed on a 3 to 5-year cycle, and the last survey of the NRL was conducted in 2007. In addition, the information gained on station access and egress, including identification of market size and opportunities to increase intermodal trips at NRL stations, would improve NJ TRANSIT’s cost-effectiveness, provide new mobility for customers, and help reduce excess traffic congestion and vehicular exhaust in Newark neighborhoods.

Archive: 2017 Ideas
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Archive: 2017 Ideas

Multimodal

Feasibility Study: Transportation Network Company (TNC) Integration for Access Link In Reserve

The existence of Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) may provide opportunities for cost-savings to Access Link, NJ TRANSIT’s statewide advance-reservation, shared ride, ADA complementary paratransit service. Presently, all Access Link trips are delivered directly by five (5) service providers that NJ TRANSIT has contracts with, serving separate geographic regions of the State. As Access Link ridership increases... more »

Idea Submitted by Susan O'Donnell, Senior Director Business Analysis & Market Research, NJ TRANSIT

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other NJ TRANSIT

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) Adam Katz, Director Policy Eligibility & Analysis NJ TRANSIT

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

An in-depth study is needed to determine the possible benefits and risks that a Transportation Network Company, like Uber or Lyft, could provide to NJ TRANSIT by integration with Access Link. Integration with a TNC may have a minor or major impact on the service design and performance of Access Link, and there are various possible configuration models that can be considered. Integrations by other transit agencies may be case studies for this research and yield considerations and “best practices” that may be beneficial for NJ TRANSIT to utilize.

Potential benefits include reduced costs of Access Link service, alternative options for accessible service to NJ TRANSIT paratransit customers, and increased participation with transportation partners in the local community.

Archive: 2017 Ideas
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Archive: 2017 Ideas

Multimodal

Analyzing the Impact of Transit-Oriented Developments on Transit Usage In Reserve

While there is a broad consensus that TODs induce additional ridership transit system, the actual net impact remains unclear. This project will seek to survey residents of TODs to determine how their trip patterns have shifted and the priorities the resulted in their living adjacent to a transit station or stop. An additional task may seek to survey customers of TOD retail. The results of this survey should try to... more »

Idea Submitted by Susan O'Donnell, Senior Director Business Analysis & Market Research

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other NJ TRANSIT

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) Mathew Safer, Sr. Director of Demand Forecasting and Research, NJ TRANSIT

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

NJ Transit is frequently asked to assess the impact of TODs on transit ridership and parking demand. While we utilize anecdotal evidence and national examples to generate impacts from new developments, we have no firm data on the impact of these developments in New Jersey. As more redevelopment takes place adjacent to transit facilities, this data will help create better estimates of ridership changes and reductions in parking demand.

Archive: 2017 Ideas
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Archive: 2017 Ideas

Multimodal

Understanding the Impact of Transportation Network Companies on Conventional Transit in NJ In Reserve

The rapid growth of transportation network companies (TNC) in the US has prompted some researchers/planners to predict a future marked by coordinated services provided by TNCs and transit agencies that would benefit TNCs, transit agencies, and people at large. However, it has also led others to predict the annihilation of conventional public transit by TNCs because of the convenience of the latter. It has thus become... more »

Idea Submitted by Devajyoti Deka, Ph.D.

List your Agency /Division / Bureau, County, City Univ. or Other Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Idea Champion - Who at NJDOT, NJ Transit or NJ Motor Vehicle? (if known) NJ TRANSIT

Why is this a priority and what are the benefits for the State/County/City?

Delay in understanding the effects of TNCs on transit in NJ can have two serious consequences. First, conventional transit may lose a part of its current riders to TNCs. Second, opportunities for mutually beneficial coordinated service between transit and TNCs would be missed.

Archive: 2017 Ideas
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Archive: 2017 Ideas